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Forum » Ski Gear Talk
Park Boots
  • TopherRitzTopherRitz
    Posts: 15Member
    Hey, what's the best boot for skiing park? I'm 14 and on a budget, so what would give me the most out of $300 or less?
  • ChrisChris
    Posts: 18Member Accepted Answer
    Take all of the boots listed here: http://freeskier.com/gear/products/category/boots and cross reference them against discounted sites like the-house.com or evo.com's outlet or backcountry.com's outlet. Your best bet for getting boots that cheap is to buy surplus gear from last season or this season. Don't compromise quality on your boots just cause you can't afford it right now. You're better off waiting and saving more money if you can't find something as a deal. Keep your feet happy.


    Also, if you're looking at last season's boots, but don't know what to look for, here's the 11/12 Gear Guide issue of Freeskier. They'll have a boots section you can use, but you'll have to find it in print. They don't keep these online ones up once the new season is posted. At least not to my knowledge.
    http://freeskier.com/mag-issue/freeskier-v14-buyers-guide-20112012
  • TopherRitzTopherRitz
    Posts: 15Member
    Thanks should be some good help in there!
  • brewskibrewski
    Posts: 49Member Accepted Answer
    @chris Dont you think @TopherRitz should try some boots on before he blindly buys them? In my 7 winters and counting as a professional bootfitter, I can't tell you how many people I have had to work with who got a boot online because they thought it was cheaper and didn't bother to try it on. Granted, I get pretty annoyed with customers who come in to try stuff on and then go buy it online, but then again I get to charge them a lot of money to fix their mistakes after they make a dumb purchase. The reality is that websites can't sell gear for less than real ski shops until the real ski shops go on sale, and the deals are usually still better in an actual ski shop. In the case of @TopherRitz, this is a kid who really needs some solid advice from an actual bootfitter. There is no such thing as "the perfect boot for park." It all comes down to fit, and to customization, and no website will ever be able to give him that but a real shop can.
  • skier_bp
    Posts: 2Member
    Like brewski said above, finding the right boot is everything and you wont know how they fit without trying them on. Finding the perfect boot is something you cant do over the internet. Also prices have been dropped in shops and are very similar to what you would find online. Also with getting new boots you will have to have your bindings adjusted to the skis which will cost you more to do if you buy online as opposed to in your local shop. @TopherRitz Good luck with the boots and go try some on at your local shop. Support local shops!
  • ChrisChris
    Posts: 18Member
    You're absolutely right @brewski. He should be trying boots on. I've never bought boots online for that very reason. I'm not sure why I didn't say that, just quick with the fingers. As far as some solid advice from a bootfitter, I'd take that with a grain of salt. On several occasions I've gone to a shop for boots and kept quiet about my experience and they've tried to put me in the completely wrong boot because they really didn't know anything about them. Also, when I was working as a ski tech at my local shop growing up, we had a guy get hired and was put on boots. People would come in and he would tell them about how he's been skiing for 20 years and fitting people in boots forever. Come to find out behind the scenes - he's a snowboarder and has only been on the board for two years. No skiing experience. Don't be a dick, because you could end up with someone who really does know what they're talking about. I'm just saying that before you go in, do some research so you know generally what boots you should be looking around at so that you guard yourself against people who really have no business telling you want you need to hear.
  • TopherRitzTopherRitz
    Posts: 15Member
    Alright, thanks everyone. I'll try to do my homework before I go to the shop.
  • brewskibrewski
    Posts: 49Member
    amen @skier_bp

    @chris sorry about the bad experiences you have had with some bootfitters in the past. I have worked with a few bullshitters too and it can get aggravating. In general we are a pretty knowledgeable group of people. That being said, I wouldn't say all bootfitters don't know what they are doing just because there are a few bad apples just like I wouldn't say that all auto mechanics are thieves because I had to pay too much for repairs once or twice. I love when customers do their homework, but the boot they come in with their heart set on because they read about it in a review is almost never the boot that they go home with. Bootfitting is all about patience and competence, and I think consumers are smart enough these days to tell whether someone is blowing smoke up their ass or they actually know what they are talking about.